Warning: Avoid Walmart’s ‘Great Value Unmeltable Ice Cream Sandwiches’

(NaturalNews) It might sound odd or just plain loony to insist that ice cream doesn’t melt, but one Cincinnati mom made the rather remarkable discovery that, yes, sometimes ice cream won’t melt.

We’ll explain.

She made her startling discovery after her son accidentally left his great value ice cream sandwich from Walmart outside while playing in temperatures of about 80 degrees F. After more than 12 hours she stumbled upon her son’s uneaten ice cream treat to find that it had not melted. Not trusting her own discovery, the mom decided to try replicating the phenomenon; to her surprise, a second ice cream sandwich also did not melt.

Nothing happens or is true if it doesn’t go viral on the Internet, so naturally, as word spread about the alleged finding, others took up the gauntlet. In this video, Dan Collins of KIKN 100.5 in Sioux Falls, S.D., put the woman’s claims to the test and, sure enough, after an hour and 15 minutes in direct sun and 80-degree weather, the Walmart great value ice cream sandwich being tested was still largely solid and had only melted a little bit. Meanwhile, a scoop of another brand of real ice cream Collins set next to the Walmart treat melted right away.

“A ‘great value?'” Collins asks rhetorically at the end of the video. “Well, maybe if it was real ice cream it would be. Sorry, Walmart. I don’t like that.”

Always read labels

As noted by Amy Goodrich writing at Blogs.NaturalNews.com, an embarrassed Walmart spokesperson came up with a theory as to why the treat didn’t melt: It has high cream concentration. Only, is that a legitimate reason for an ice cream treat not to melt?

Absolutely not, according to Prof. Sean O’Keefe, Goodrich writes. Actually, he says, just the opposite is true: More cream or fat would make the treats melt more quickly (which is why the real ice cream Collins used during his field experiment didn’t last long at all in the direct sun and 80-degree heat). The fact is, non-fat or non-cream ice cream takes longer to melt, so the Walmart brand is really just a “great deal” to the company, because less cream means they are less expensive to manufacture (and, of course, they are far less pure, as Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, knows well). Less fat and cream mean a higher water content, which is why those sandwiches take longer to melt.

Also, there are the additives that cheap ice cream brands like Walmart add. As Goodrich writes:

Gums are complex carbs that were originally derived from plants to be used as thickeners or gel-forming agents. These days however most gums are synthetically made in the lab.Gums and other chemically altered substance are not found in high quality or homemade ice creams, but this one bursts with it. Real ice cream, or the one you make at home, actually contains very few ingredients. Milk, cream, sugar, vanilla, chocolate or fresh fruits are basically it.

Phony ‘foods’

She notes further that artificial food ingredients have been linked to many, many health issues, including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, food allergies and cardiovascular problems.

And there is one more important thing to note: In order for ice cream to be labeled as such, the product only has to contain 10 percent milk and the rest can be just about anything else. That’s what makes reading a product label so important, in order to avoid overtly processed foods. By the way, it’s always best, if it’s ice cream you have a hankering for, to make it fresh at home, using only natural and organic ingredients. That way you’ll know exactly what is in it (and that it will melt – quickly – in the summer sun).

“This Walmart ice cream issue is actually not the only story out there. Have you ever seen the picture passing by from the eternal Mc Donald hamburger that lasts forever without getting moldy (it is spoilage free since 1996)? They found that the meat patty is loaded with salt (sodium) which is a preservative and the hamburger bun doesn’t even come close to real, natural bread,” writes Goodrich.

True story.

Sources:

YouTube.com

Blogs.NaturalNews.com

Science.NaturalNews.com

Written by J. D. Heyes

Learn more: Natural News 

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